Monday, 21 February 2011

THE EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION AND THE U.S. PUPPET

Ron Paul, a popular U.S. Congressman, have declared that U.S. investment in Egypt was a big mistake. Paul confirmed that he did not believe the support of Egypt was a good investment because "it was not well spent. It ended up in chaos, and we don't know who the next dictator is going to be and it helped contribute to our bankruptcy."

I can not believe he is saying this stuff out loud on CNN. Ron Paul said, "I prefer another option rather than bombing people or giving them money."

"Maybe many of us has the idea that United States has been an imperialist force for many decades. The belief which was openly promoted by the government all throughout American history up until recently was that the Anglo Saxon race was superior to all others and thus had the right to conquer and spread their ways to the inferior people of the world."




A new history begins


Thousands of youths started a new revolution on Tahrir Square. The army tried to move them off. The protesting youth responded by shouting: “The Army is Egypt’s foundation! Your job is to carry out our demands, not drive us from the square! Otherwise we will return!”

It was February 11 when Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that Hosni Mubarak had resigned as Egypt’s president. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-rule finally finished.

Power is temporarily handed over to Egyptian army. It has not dissolved the government, but at least it dissolved parliament and suspended the constitution. Egyptian army has a crucial role to play in deciding the future.

For now Egypt’s population is extremely happy. Mubarak is not president anymore. The protesters believe that the revolution was a success.



United States supported Mubarak

While Mubarak was in the power, United States was his best friend, betther than that, Mubarak was the American marionette. But, as soon as American leaders saw how strong protests were, they change their discurse. This time Mubarak was not welcome. He has become a "dictator."

Joe Biden, curent Vice President of the United States, said to PBS News Hour:

"Mubarak has been an ally of ours in a number of things. And he's been very responsible on, relative to geopolitical interest in the region, the Middle East peace efforts; the actions Egypt has taken relative to normalizing relationship with -- with Israel. ... I would not refer to him as a dictator."

When Mubarak felt threatened, he has no option that responding to the protesters' demands Friday morning by close down the Internet, including Facebook and Twitter accounts. It is here when we have to wonder if Joe Biden really believes that leaders can close down the Internet when citizens push them for changes.



What's Next?

Some officials of the U.S. Department of State said to Time magazine that United States is preparing a new package of assistance to Egyptian opposition groups, designed to help with constitutional reform, democratic development and election organizing. The package is still being formulated, and the officials decline to say how much it would be worth or to which groups it would be directed.

And Hillary Clinton said, "We are going to try to work with a lot of like-minded countries around the world to offer whatever assistance we can."

United States has a very long history of providing assistance to new democracy movements. The United States credibility is almost nothing. We do not have to mix what some pseudo-leaders do with how American citizens really are. Most of them are very human.

Middle East has always been a zone of permanent tension, but if the next Egypt's president does not ratify the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty signed in 1979; the consequences could reach monumental magnitudes.
According to former Israeli ambassador to Cairo Zvi Mazel, Egypt will lose its leading position in the region, causing Turkey and Iran to become more influential, which is dangerous for Israel. On the other hand, Paul said, "Washington’s efforts to buy influence in countries like Egypt have failed and will always fail".

New elections are close. New changes will come to Egypt.
People talk insistently about Vice President Suleiman, for many the CIA's man, as next Egypt´s president. It seems that Suleiman has no opponents, despite the ambitions of former Interior Minister and current League of Arab Nations Secretary-General Amr Moussa and modest former IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei.

We all have great responsibilities for the future. It can not be disputed. All kind of help from industrialized nations to support developing ones is always welcome. But, it does not mean we have to accept pressure or blackmail. If the United States or any other country wants to reduce the economic or political problems anywhere in the world, it will be accepted only when good intentions prevail.


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